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ENGL 1102 | CRA Reminders

We need to adhere to strict CRA guidelines for this activity to be useful and easy to assess. If you have not already, make sure you’re familiar with the CRA guidelines.

Here are some common errors that result in loss of full credit on a CRA task. If you’ve received less than a 5/5 on CRA1, return to your work, edit it, and DM me by Sunday, 9/5, to let me know that I should regrade it. Identify what you’ve changed in your DM.

Brainstormers

  • 1-3 sentences only
  • Use 3 separate messages and not one message with 3 reflections
  • Avoid personal narratives
  • Stick to observations/analysis about the text (not issues beyond the text)
  • Avoid use of “you” in academic writing
  • Avoid summary
  • Be familiar with what’s been posted before you; avoid redundancy.

Researchers

  • Adhere strictly to MLA guidelines in citation
  • Be sure to follow annotation format (summarize, quote from text, explain relevance to the reading)
  • Avoid use of “you” in academic writing
  • Be familiar with what’s been posted before you; avoid redundancy.

Analysts

  • Be sure to use the “create a post” feature so that your submission does not look like a regular message but like a blog post that needs to be clicked to open
  • Choose a title and a first sentence that quickly identifies what section/idea of the text you are analyzing
  • Use paragraph divisions intentionally to provide structure to your argument (2 or 3 paragraphs are appropriate)
  • Identify brainstormers and researchers by their username
  • Quote from brainstormers’ messages; quote from researchers’ sources (not their annotations)
  • Avoid use of “you” in academic writing
  • Avoid summary
  • Be familiar with what’s been posted before you; avoid redundancy.

Curators

  • Cite the work of 2-4 students and quote from them; privilege the work of the analysts (cite from at least one of them)
  • Be sure to focus on the work of the class, not as much analyzing the text
  • Keep to 100-150 words if you can (minus the words of others you use)
  • Avoid use of “you” in academic writing
  • Be familiar with what’s been posted before you; avoid redundancy.

Everyone

  • Be familiar with at least one researcher’s source and at least one analyst post by the end of the weekend (use reaction emojis to identify them).

Published in engl1102

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